When to Think About Temporal Arteritis

When an older patient comes in for a headache, besides the common headaches like migraine, cluster, and tension headaches, it is also very important to consider Temporal Arteritis. Here, I will explain to you what this is. What is it? In summary, temporal arteritis, also known as Giant Cell Arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis of medium and large arteries. While…

Food Diversity in New York

As Irene and I, and our friends Eli and Weena were leaving the Museum of Modern Art, we ran into a blockade of people by 53rd street. No, they weren’t waiting in line to go into the museum. No, they weren’t holding a protest. No, they weren’t having a street-side social, doing an Improv Everywhere skit, or forming a flash…

Family Medicine at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital

It’s amazing how time flies. I’m already a little more than half-way through this rotation! The family medicine rotation at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital is 6 weeks total and during this time, we are assigned to 3 weeks of inpatient shifts and 3 weeks of outpatient shifts. This past week, I just finished my outpatient portion, and have started my inpatient portion.…

We All Cry The Same Way

I first met Gina during my family med rotation. After years of smoking and drug use, her voice was deep and raspy, despite being only 23. I could tell her skin was weathered, hiding under a thick layer of makeup and mascara. She had come in for a drug detox, and needed an initial physical exam. “Are you pregnant?” Dr.…

New York, New York

Hello all! I’ve just survived my first week in New York City! Although I’m rotating in the Bronx, I decided to stay in Manhattan due to some people’s suggestions. Because I want to enjoy the perks of being in Manhattan but also be close to the Bronx (and save money at the same time), I’ve decided to stay in northern…

Ninety Eight Percent

From day one when I first met my class, I’ve always been amazed at the caliber of students that come into and out of AUC, despite being a Caribbean medical school. I see the drive and the passion in my classmates, upperclassmen, and alumni. Many of us are motivated by our past mistakes, our desire to not give up on…

Pediatric Rotation in Miami

Yet again, I have finished another rotation… pediatrics is DONE! I just took my NBME shelf exam for pediatrics on Friday in Miami, and now as I write this, I am in the middle of New York City, about to start my next rotation in family medicine at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital for the next 6 weeks. I am going to miss…

Things I Miss About St. Maarten

It’s been about a year since I left St. Maarten. Since leaving, I have passed the USMLE Step 1, gotten married, finished a psych rotation in Blackburn, England, then finished a psych sub-internship, internal medicine rotation, and pediatric rotation in Miami. How time flies! Sure, there were a lot of things that I don’t miss about the island… like the…

All About TORCH Infections

The ToRCHeS are a group of infections that can be passed from the pregnant mother to her fetus through the placenta. They can infect anytime during gestation, and sometimes during the time of delivery as well. Since they can cause mental retardation, morbidity, and even death, they are important to recognize and prevent. So far in my pediatric rotation, I…

Closing the Gap

Ever since leaving the island, I’ve been joining the Facebook groups of different incoming classes at AUC to update myself as of what’s going on on campus, and to be of use here and there and participate in discussions. I’m probably the only clinical student that still participate in the groups, which were originally created for the student orientation advisors…

The Game

“We’re going to play a game” Dr. Vuong said to Erin and me.”I’d like you to go into the next room and ask the patient’s mother everything about the patient but the age. I’ll tell the mother not to reveal to you her baby’s age. Then, I’d like you to come back to me, then using the clues you’ve gathered,…

Seizures You Might See in Children

When you first see a seizure, or experience it yourself for the first time, it can be quite freightening. Seizures can present in numerous different ways, often not what we think of when we usually think of “seizures.” Here, I’d like to present a few types of seizures and epileptic syndromes you may see in children. First, a little about…

Tower of Babel

Being multilingual opens up tons of opportunities for doctors to communicate better with patients. By far, Spanish is the second most common language spoken in the United States (and the world) and it is growing. Some places in the US, Spanish first-language speakers are the majority. Here in Miami, Spanish is the language of the streets and the workplace, and…

Things I’ve Seen So Far in Clinicals

Hey everyone! As you can see, I’ve been really busy with rotations and shelf exams that I haven’t been updating my blog as much these past few months. Just an update, I am doing well and am in the middle of my pediatric rotation right now in Miami. My attending right now Dr. Calle has been great. The other AUC…

Management of Osteomyelitis

How Do We Get Osteomyelitis? Osteomyelitis is when you have an infection of the bone. It can be caused either by hematological spread that leads to sepsis of the bone, or by direct spread from an adjacent trauma wound, infected diabetic foot ulcer, decubitus ulcer, or some other ulcer that spreads to bone. Hematogenous osteomyelitis happens in 20% of the…

Empiric Antibiotic Therapy for Pneumonia

How Do We Get Pneumonia? Our body has a pretty good natural barrier to protect the lungs from potential pathogens. First, we have hair and turbinates in our nose to block out larger particles. Then we have cilia that constantly sweep mucus-trapped pathogens out of our bronchioles and trachea, and not to mention a cough reflex. We also have tons…

Things You Might See in a Newborn

To prepare for my upcoming week in the neonatal nursery for my pediatric rotation, I’ve decided to put together this list of common and not-so-common conditions that one may see in the newborn. When babies are born, you may see things here and there that might worry you. However, not all abnormal findings are bad and many of them go…

Books for Clinical Rotations

In Basic Sciences, we learned about what the normal body is and how diseases can make it abnormal. However, in Clinical Sciences, the emphasis is more on diagnosis, treatment, and decision-making, particularly what the next best step in the management of an individual patient is.  Deciding what the “next best step” is for a patient is a challenge and may…

iPhone Apps for Clinical Rotations

During your clinical rotations, it’s always nice to have a pocket pharmacopedia with you, and a reference handbook, and a calculator, and a pen light, and your textbooks… but unfortunately there are only so many things you can fit in the pockets of your white coat. Luckily, the iPhone and other smart handheld devices have applications that can replace all…

Smell

After rotating in internal medicine for the past two months, it’s clear to me that medicine is an art that requires the awareness of all the senses… Through vision we can detect any lesions, changes of color, and general health of our patients. Through touch we can determine the location, size, shape, and texture of an abnormal mass or organ.…